Venous Sinus Disease

Also known as: venous sinus occlusive disease, cerebral venous thrombosis, intracranial venous thrombosis.

What is venous sinus disease?

The venous sinuses are spaces or openings between different layers of the brain that drain blood from the brain. When problems such as blood clots or other issues occur in the venous sinuses, it is known as venous sinus disease.

What causes venous sinus disease?

The cause of venous sinus disease is not entirely clear. It’s more likely to occur in people with other health problems such as heart disease, iron deficiency, sickle cell anemia and others. Head injuries, dehydration, pregnancy, cancer and obesity are other conditions that can make venous sinus disease more likely to occur.

What are the symptoms of venous sinus disease?

Headache, fainting, loss of control of body parts, seizures, blurred vision, focal neurological deficits such as weakness or numbness on one side of the body, and coma are all potential symptoms of venous sinus disease.

What are venous sinus disease care options?

Treatments is focused on emergency care and preventing the severe complications of venous sinus disease. It might include medications, fluids, treatments to relieve pressure in the head, surgery and rehabilitation.


Reviewed by: Anuj Jayakar, MD

This page was last updated on: 7/30/2018 8:27:58 AM

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