Bronchial Challenge Tests

Also known as: bronchial provocation tests, methacholine challenge test.

What are bronchial challenge tests?

A bronchial challenge test is a tool used by physicians to diagnose asthma and other breathing problems. It involves using chemicals or allergens in a controlled environment to simulate the symptoms of asthma, and then diagnose the results.

What happens during the procedure?

The patient first does some basic breathing tests in order to establish lung function before the test. Then the patient inhales a chemical known as methacholine, or another allergy-causing substance, through a nebulizer machine. Afterward, the patient repeats the breathing tests, and the physician notes the changes in lung function.

Is any special preparation needed? 

The patient may need to avoid smoking, certain medications, cold air and exercise before the test. The test may not be given if the patient has or has recently had a cold or other respiratory infection.

What are the risk factors?

An asthma attack is a potential complication of the test, but it is conducted in a safe, controlled environment


Reviewed by: Antonio Rodriguez, MD

This page was last updated on: 6/14/2018 3:33:13 PM


Upcoming Events

Ventilation Assisted Children's Center (VACC) Camp

VACC Camp is a week-long sleep-away camp for children requiring ventilator assistance (tracheostomy ventilator, C-PAP, BiPAP, or oxygen to support breathing) and their families.  Learn more.

Register Online

9th Annual Dr. Moises Simpser VACC Camp Golf Tournament

Join us for a great day of golf, delicious dinner and exciting auction...all to benefit the children of VACC Camp. Learn more.

From the Newsdesk

Dental Health in Children with Asthma
The medications that an asthmatic child uses could have effects on the oral mucosa.
 
July Patient of the Month: Justin
The moment Justin was born, his mother and father were faced with the most daunting and challenging experience any parent can imagine. Just hours after birth, Justin was airlifted to Nicklaus Children’s Hospital for more specialized pediatric care. Having been diagnosed with pulmonary atresia and tetralogy of Fallot, he required immediate attention before it was too late.