Lung Resection

Also known as: wedge resection, pneumonectomy.

What is a lung resection?

A lung resection is a surgery that removes a part of the lung. The procedure is performed more commonly in children for malformations they are born with, but it can be performed for cancer and infection like in adults.


What happens during the procedure?

There are many different types of lung resection. The surgeons will choose the most appropriate method for the child. The resection is either performed with open surgery or with less invasive techniques like thoracoscopy or robotic surgery.


Is any special preparation needed?

The patient will need to avoid food, drink and certain medications prior to the procedure.


What should I expect for recovery?

After surgery some patients have to be observed in the intensive care unit. Sometimes they need to be helped to breath with a machine until they can breathe on their own; usually this does not last more than a night. There is a small tube that comes out of the chest and is usually removed in a few days. The child will be encouraged to get up and walk as soon as possible to help reactivate their breathing.


What are the risk?

Infection, bleeding, pain, collapsed lung or damage to surrounding organs and tissues are potential risks of lung resection.


Reviewed by: Leopoldo Malvezzi, MD

This page was last updated on: 11/9/2018 9:51:14 AM

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January Patient of the Month: Layla
When Layla was 5, she came to Nicklaus Children's Hospital with a severe case of scoliosis. To help straighten her spine, Layla spent time in halo gravity traction. While her mom returned home to Gainesville for work and school, the nurses at Nicklaus Children's took care of Layla, acting as substitute mothers and making sure she was well cared for.
January Patient of the Month: Layla
When Layla was 5, she came to Nicklaus Children's Hospital with a severe case of scoliosis. To help straighten her spine, Layla spent time in halo gravity traction. While her mom returned home to Gainesville for work and school, the nurses at Nicklaus Children's took care of Layla, acting as substitute mothers and making sure she was well cared for.