Conditions We Treat

Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia is a severe debilitating eating disorder that occurs most frequently in girls that is characterized by a distorted view of their body that leads them to believe they're overweight and need to restrict how much they eat, over exercise, and/or perform other behaviors that prevents them from gaining weight, almost to starvation. Learn more about Anorexia Nervosa.

Autoimmune Enteropathy

An autoimmune disorder refers to a medical condition in which the immune system mistakenly attacks the body’s own organs and tissues, thinking they are a foreign invader. Autoimmune enteropathy occurs when the immune system attacks the intestines, which leads to frequent diarrhea and other nutritional problems in children. Learn more about Autoimmune Enteropathy.

Bulimia

Bulimia is a type of eating disorder where children/adolescents will have episodes of uncontrollable overeating. Learn more about Bulimia.

Carbohydrate Malabsorption

When people’s bodies are unable to absorb sugars, starches and other carbohydrates, this condition is known as carbohydrate malabsorption. It can lead to a number of complications. Learn more about Carbohydrate Malabsorption.

Diabetes (Type 1)

Normally, the pancreas produces a hormone called insulin which enables the sugar in the blood to move into the body’s cells to provide energy. In children with type 1 diabetes, the child’s body no longer produces insulin. Learn more about Diabetes (Type 1).

Eating Disorders

The term “Eating disorder” refers to a variety of persistent and different eating or eating related behaviors that result in a change in the way a child/adolescent/young adult consumes or absorbs food and which significantly causes poorer physical and psychosocial functioning. Learn more about Eating Disorders.

Feeding Disorders or Difficulties

The terms feeding disorders or feeding difficulties are frequently used to refer to infants and children who have problems with eating enough and/or an appropriate variety of foods. Learn more about Feeding Disorders or Difficulties.

Food Protein Induced Proctocolitis of Infancy

This is when an infant, typically between 2-8 weeks of age pass bloody, mucusy stools. Learn more about Food Protein Induced Proctocolitis of Infancy.

Intestinal Dysmotility

The actions of the muscles and nerves in the gastrointestinal tract that mix and move food (muscle contraction and relaxation) along is the known as motility. When something goes wrong with this action in the muscles or in the nerves of the intestines, this is referred to as intestinal dysmotility. Learn more about Intestinal Dysmotility.

Iron Deficiency Anemia

Anemia is a medical condition that occurs when the body’s blood doesn’t have enough healthy red blood cells containing hemoglobin. Iron is needed to make hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia in children. Learn more about Iron Deficiency Anemia.

Lipodystrophy

Lipodystrophy is a rare medical condition in which a child has an abnormality in how the body stores fat. Children with lipodystrophy may have very little body fat (fat loss may range from very small areas or total body absence of fat) but store a lot of fat in other parts of the body like the blood or in internal organs. This is often suspected when thin children present with other disorders such as diabetes, a fatty liver, a large spleen, a fatty heart among other presentations. Learn more about Lipodystrophy.

Lymphomas

Lymphomas are a type of cancer involving lymphocytes, which are cells within the immune system that help the body fight off infections. Learn more about Lymphomas.

Malnutrition

When individuals are not getting the necessary nutrients and calories from the diet that they need for daily functioning and growth, this is known as malnutrition. Learn more about Malnutrition.

Metabolic Storage Diseases

Metabolic storage diseases are a fairly large group of rare genetic inherited disorders in which specific enzymes of a child's cell are insufficient. Enzymes help break down certain materials within the cell for proper cell function. Learn more about Metabolic Storage Diseases.

Obesity

Growing children and adolescents normally gain weight and height each year and the path that they follow is measured by weight and height charts (growth charts) which define the normal range for each age and sex. The Body Mass Index (BMI) takes into account whether a child’s weight falls within the normal range taking into account his/her height, age and sex. While there a number of ways to define obesity, the BMI is widely used to measure obesity (a BMI greater than the normal range for age, sex and height). Learn more about Obesity.

Phenylketonuria

Children with phenylketonuria do not produce an enzyme that helps o breaks down the amino acid phenylalanine. Buildup of phenylalanine can lead to symptoms such as delayed physical and intellectual development. Learn more about Phenylketonuria.

Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Soft tissue sarcomas are cancers are rare kinds of cancers that affect the body’s soft tissues. Learn more about Soft Tissue Sarcomas.

Wilms’ tumor

Wilms tumor is a rare type of cancer that starts in the kidney and occurs most often in children ages 3 or 4. Learn more about Wilms’ tumor.