Dislocations

Also known as: joint dislocation

What are dislocations?

When a joint in the body is injured in such a way that the bones are forced out of position, this is known as a dislocation. They can occur anywhere from the shoulder to the knee, and even the fingers and toes.

What causes dislocations?

An injury or accident that causes a sudden impact to the joint is the cause of a dislocation.  

What are the symptoms of dislocations?

Severe pain, numbness, tingling, swelling, bruising and difficulty with movements are telltale signs of a dislocation. Sometimes, it’s clearly visible that the joints are out of alignment or misshapen.

What are dislocation care options?

In most cases, the doctor can reduce the bones back into position. A splint or sling might be needed to limit movement afterward until the joint heals. More severe dislocations might require surgery to correct.

Reviewed by: Craig Spurdle, MD

This page was last updated on: September 09, 2020 11:13 AM

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