Peripheral Nerve Injuries we Treat

The brachial plexus is a network of nerves within the neck that supply the arm with motor input and sensory feedback. Injuries to the brachial plexus can occur during the birthing process or as a result of trauma, including falls, sports injuries, penetrating injuries (stab wounds/gunshot wounds) and motor vehicle collisions.

In addition to our focus on the brachial plexus, the Program also provides care for children with injuries or diseases (including tumors) of other peripheral nerves throughout the body.

Read more about the different kinds of injuries and syndromes treated by the program below:

AIN Syndrome/Pronator Syndrome

AIN syndrome and pronator syndrome are two related conditions that involve nerve dysfunction in the area of the elbow and forearm that cause pain and other symptoms. Both are related to the nerve being compressed or entrapped. Learn more

Arm & Hand Spasticity

Upper extremity spasticity refers to increased muscle tone and hyperactive reflexes in the arm. It is usually due to a problem with motor nerves in the brain, and can be caused by cerebral palsy, stroke or traumatic brain injury. Learn more

Birth-related Brachial Plexus Injury

Birth-related brachial plexus palsy refers to injury of the nerves that lead from the cervical (neck) spinal cord to the arm. These nerves can be injured during a difficult delivery. The result is weakness and/or loss of sensation in the affected arm. Learn more

Brachial Plexopathy

Please see Brachial Plexus Injuries for further information.

Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injuries

The brachial plexus is a network of peripheral nerves that originate in the neck region and branch off to various muscles of the arm to control movement and sensation in the shoulders, arm, forearm and hand. Injuries to the brachial plexus are most commonly seen in newborns during the process of child-birth. Other causes may include motor vehicle accidents or tumors that may affect the nerves. Learn more

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

The median nerve is a mixed (motor and sensory) nerve of the upper extremity. If it becomes compressed as it travels through the wrist, the result can be carpal tunnel syndrome, which causes a number of symptoms in hand. Learn more

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

The ulnar nerve is a mixed (sensory and motor) nerve that runs along the inner part of the elbow. If it gets compressed, the result can be cubital tunnel syndrome, which causes a number of symptoms in the arm and hand. Learn more

Leg & Foot Spasticity

Spasticity of the lower extremity ranges from mild to very disabling. The affected muscles may be over-active and cause joint contractures (stiff joints). Learn more

Nerve Injuries

Nerves are the system of fibers that carry signals from the brain to the rest of the body. When an injury or damage occurs to one or many nerves, these are known as nerve injuries. Learn more

Neurofibromatosis

Neurofibromatosis (NF) is a medical term that refers to a group of three unique but related disorders of the nervous system: NF1, NF2 and schwannomatosis. Learn more

Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy/Injury

Brachial plexus birth injury refers to damage to the brachial plexus that occurs at birth, and may be related to a difficult labor and delivery. Learn more

Peripheral Nerve Injuries

Please see Brachial Plexus Injuries for further information.

Peroneal Nerve Injury/Palsy

The peroneal nerve is an important nerve in the lower leg. It provides sensory input from the lateral aspect of the lower leg and the dorsum (top) of the foot. It also provides motor input to the muscles responsible for dorsiflexion (lifting the foot off of the ground) and eversion of the foot. When this nerve becomes injured, it can lead to sensation and movement problems, most commonly, a condition known as foot drop. Learn more

Plexiform Neurofibroma

Plexiform neurofibromas are a rare, benign (non-cancerous) form of tumor that can occur almost anywhere in the body, such as the face, arm, back, chest, legs and elsewhere. Learn more

Radial Nerve Palsy

The radial nerve is responsible for sensation and movement along the posterior aspect of the arm and hand. Injury to this nerve is referred to as radial nerve palsy, and the symptoms typically include loss of sensation along the posterior aspect of arm, forearm and hand. Learn more

Schwannoma

Schwannoma is most frequently a benign (non-spreading) tumor of both children and young adults that begins in the Schwann cells (the cells of the membrane that protects the nerves) of any peripheral nerve in the body; often in the nerves of the head, neck, arms or legs. Learn more

Shoulder Dystocia

Please see birth-related brachial plexus injury for further information.

Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury

Injury to the brachial plexus can occur from a variety of causes. The nerves can be cut, stretched, crushed, or squeezed (compressed). Stretch or impact of the neck, shoulder or arm can lead to injuries to the nerves of the brachial plexus. Learn more