New Pediatric Sports Health Center Focuses on Injury Prevention


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Dr. John Ragheb, Director of the Division of Neurosurgery at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital, is among a group of renowned physicians who developed the first evidence-based guideline in the U.S. on mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and concussions among children, published by the CDC in September. 
445 students receive free EKG screenings
The Heart Program at Nicklaus Children’s, in conjunction with the Breanna Vergara Foundation, hosted an EKG screening at St. Brendan Catholic Elementary School as part of the ongoing effort to detect congenital conditions that can lead to sudden cardiac death in children.
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STOP Sports Injuries
The STOP Sports Injuries Campaign wants to be sure that you have all the information you need to keep kids in the game for life. Whether you are an athlete, coach, healthcare provider or parent, we have the sports injury prevention tips and tools to make sure safety is your first priority.

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Nicklaus Children's Hospital Heart Program Hosts National Conference on 'Sudden Death in the Young'
Pediatric cardiologists from throughout North America will focus on identification and treatment of Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and medical conditions that can lead to sudden cardiac death in children and teens.

Miami Children’s Offers Free Teen Athlete Heart Screenings Aimed at Preventing Sudden Cardiac Death
​Miami Children’s Hospital is offering free electrocardiograms (ECGs or EKGs) to middle and high school athletes in an effort to identify those at risk of sudden cardiac death and prevent  tragedy.