For Patients and Families

Why personalized medicine? At Nicklaus Children’s, researchers and clinicians are working together to improve the way healthcare is delivered to each child. 

What does this mean for me or my child?

We know you may have questions or want to learn more about genetics, genomics and what it means for health and wellness. The Nicklaus PMI provides summary documents, links to other resources, and answers to frequent questions about genetics, genomics and genetic testing.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is the difference between genetics and genomics?
A: Genetics is the study of inheritance, or the way traits are passed down from each generation. Genes carry instructions that influence traits, for example hair color or height. Genomics is a term used to describe the study of all genes in a person, as well as interactions of genes with an individual’s environment.
Q: I am pregnant or am planning to become pregnant and have questions about prenatal genetic screening. Where can I go for information or services?
A: The Victor Center at Nicklaus Children’s provides comprehensive services including education, counseling services, and affordable preconception genetic screening.
The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) also has helpful online resources.  Q: What should I know about family health history?
A: Your family health history may indicate if you or your child are at genetic risk for certain conditions. It may help your doctor make a diagnosis if your child shows symptoms of a disease or customize health services.
The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Genetic Alliance have resources that can help you start a conversation about family health history with your health care provider.


Patient Advocacy and Resources

  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)- GARD provides the public with access to current, reliable, and easy-to-understand information about rare or genetic diseases in English and Spanish.
  • Genetic Alliance- Genetic Alliance engages individuals, families, and communities to advocate for access to quality genetic services.