Radiosurgery

Also known as: stereotactic radiosurgery, SRS, cyberknife.

What is radiosurgery?

Radiosurgery is a form of radiation therapy that delivers large doses of highly concentrated, specifically targeted, radiation to exactly the area of the body where it’s needed without damaging the normal healthy tissue around it.
 

What happens during the procedure?

The patient lies on a table and, depending on the age of the child (and other factors) , will be given an anesthetic so he/she will be asleep during the procedure.  A machine is used to deliver the radiation via a robotic arm. Doctors and nurses are in a separate room and can communicate with the patient.
 

Is any special preparation needed?

Depending on the type and whether sedation/anesthesia is used, your child will have an intravenous catheter placed in his/her arm and may need to avoid food or drink for a set period of time before the procedure.
 

What are the risk factors?

Radiosurgery is a fairly safe form of radiation therapy with minimal risks, though there may be some short and longer - term side effects. Your Nicklaus Children’s hospital’s subspecialist team will be available to outline these for you.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 7/25/2018 1:52:09 PM

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