Overuse Injuries

Also known as: repetitive motion injuries.

What are overuse injuries?

An overuse injury is a type of injury that occurs not from one sudden, traumatic accident, but rather from the repetition of a motion over and over again for months or years that ultimately causes damage to a part of the
body. They are also known as repetitive motion injuries.

What causes overuse injuries?

Overuse injuries frequently occur due to a repetitive motion that is part of an individual’s job or participation in athletics. For example, professional baseball pitchers often experience overuse injuries in their arms of shoulders. People in the construction and manufacturing trade are also prone to overuse injuries.

What are the symptoms of overuse injuries?

Symptoms will vary based on the nature and severity of the injury. In general, the symptoms can include pain, limited range and weakness of motion in the affected area. This may occur after the activity occurs, during the activity or at all times depending on how severe the injury is.

What are overuse injury care options?

In less severe instances, overuse injuries can be remedied with proper stretching, ice and cutting back or restricting the activity that caused the injury. More severe injuries may require surgery and physical therapy to rehabilitate the injured body part.


Reviewed by: Annie L Casta, MD

This page was last updated on: 8/7/2018 10:08:09 AM

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