ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) Injury

Also known as: ACL

What is an ACL Injury?

A torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) — a ligament that helps give the knee its stability — is one of the most serious types of knee injuries. Kids with a partially or completely torn ACL will definitely feel pain when the ACL tear happens. Afterward, they may or may not have symptoms, depending on the severity of the injury.
 

How many ACL injuries are reported annually?

About 250,000 to 300,000 people per experience a complete ACL tear each year.
 

Who is most likely to sustain this type of injury?

Female high school and college athletes are three to four times more likely than their male athlete counterparts to sustain an ACL injury.
 

ACL Re-injury

After an ACL surgery, one in four athletes will incur a second ACL injury.
 

ACL Injury Recovery

Extensive rehabilitation with physical therapy is required after an ACL injury and the athlete must temporarily suspend participation in the chosen sport for an extended period.
 

ACL Injury Prevention

Research shows that participation in a neuromuscular training program can reduce the risk of ACL injury in female athlete.

ACL Injury illustration


This page was last updated on: 5/22/2018 4:02:27 PM


Upcoming Events

Best Practices in Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Symposium

This one day course will include educational sessions, case studies, and panel discussions that highlight evidence-based information for managing Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and other related disabilities for children ages birth to 5.

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ACL Injury Prevention Training Group Class

A training program designed to correct biomechanical risk factors of an ACL injury, focused on improving strength, power, and agility and led by Sports Health Performance Specialists. Program consists of 4-10 participants and offered once or twice a week, over 6 weeks. 

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Running Injury Prevention Group Class

A training program designed to correct biomechanical risk factors of a runner and improve strength, power, and running mechanics, led by Sports Health Performance Specialists. Program consists of 4-10 participants and offered once or twice a week, over 6 weeks.

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Dance Injury Prevention Group Class

A training program designed to improve strength, range of motion, balance and neuromuscular control to enhance performance and reduce the risk of dance related injuries. Program consists of 4-10 participants and offered once or twice a week, over 6 weeks.

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Off-Season Sports Conditioning Group Class

This program is designed to prepare athletes for their individual sports season to ensure optimize sports performance and prevent injury. Athletes will focus a periodization of 3 weeks strength and endurance phase, followed by a 3 week power phase led by Sports Health Performance Specialists. Program consists of 4-10 participants and is offered once or twice a week, over 6 weeks. 

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Video

video
Lucky started going to physical therapy when he was two because of the delays with sitting up and rolling over. His physical therapist noticed that the problem was not muscular but skeletal, a condition that she couldn't treat. The pediatrician told Janie and Greg, Lucky’s parents, about Nicklaus Children's Hospital. When Janie and Greg visited Nicklaus Children’s Hospital, they met Dr. Harry L Shufflebarger, Pediatric Spinal Surgery Director. He performed the necessary surgeries and now Lucky can enjoy a healthy life.


From the Newsdesk

Sports Health Center at Pinecrest
04/17/2018 — The Sports Health Center at Pinecrest is designed to help the young athletes in our community when it comes to prevention and rehabilitation of sports injuries.
Helping Female Athletes Prevent Sports-Related Knee Injuries
04/11/2018 — Today we are seeing an increasing number of girls playing competitive sports, with roughly 200,000 at the collegiate level. This rise in 200,000 at the collegiate level. This risen in participation has afforded female athletes many social and health benefits including improved physical fitness, confidence, teamwork and a decreased risk of obesity.