Hemifacial Microsomia

Also known as: craniofacial microsomia, Oculo-Auriculo-Vertebral Spectrum.

What is hemifacial microsomia?

If a baby is born with the tissue on one side of the face underdeveloped, this is known as hemifacial microsomia. It’s a birth defect that can have implications beyond just the physical abnormalities.
 

What causes hemifacial microsomia? 

The cause of hemifacial microsomia is not entirely clear. There may be a genetic component to the condition, and it appears that a small number of cases are passed from parents to children. It may have something to do with poor blood supply to the fetus in the womb.
 

What are the symptoms of hemifacial microsomia? 

The physical symptoms can range from mild to severe and impact the eye socket, ear, jaw, cheek and other parts of the face. The nerves and tissues on that part of the face may also not work properly. Some children may also have problems with the spine, heart and kidneys.
 

What are hemifacial microsomia care options?

Reconstructive surgery is an option for many of the problems related to hemifacial microsomia. A child may need assistance from many other specialists, such as dentists, speech therapists or psychologists, for supportive care when coping with the complications related to the condition.

Reviewed by: Saoussen Salhi, MD

This page was last updated on: 1/15/2018 2:57:42 PM

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