Glioma

Also known as: mixed glioma, astrocytoma, ependymoma, optic glioma, gliomatosis cerebri

What is glioma?

Glioma is a form of cancer that develops from glial cells of the brain - those cells which support and nourish the neurons.

Gliomas can vary depending the type of glial cell found:

They also vary depending on their location (brainstem/optic nerve/spine or other part of the brain), and on their grade (depending on how normal or abnormal the cells appear):
  • low grade tumors (grades 1 and 2; 66%; localized and grow slowly)
  • higher grade (3 and 4 grow faster)

What causes glioma?

Cause is unknown, though it appears that some genetic disorders increase the likelihood of their development.

What are the symptoms of glioma?

Symptoms will vary depending on the exact type of glioma, its size and location. Some common symptoms include seizures, headaches, speech problems, numbness or weakness in the face, legs or arms.

What are glioma care options?

Treatments may include all or some of, surgery to remove as much of the tumor as possible, chemotherapy (before or after surgery), and radiation therapy.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: December 16, 2020 02:22 PM

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