Pulmonary Stenosis

Also known as: pulmonary valve stenosis

​What is Pulmonary Stenosis?

When the heart squeezes ( contracts ), the pulmonary valve controls the flow of blood from the right side of the heart ( right ventricle ) out to the lungs. When this valve is defective, it doesn’t open fully and partially blocks the flow of blood because two of its three sections are stuck together or are too thick. This is  known as pulmonary stenosis.


What causes pulmonary stenosis?

Pulmonary stenosis is usually a congenital heart defect, which means that babies are born with it. It’s often present with other heart defects. In older people it can occur as a complication of diseases like rheumatic fever or carcinoid syndrome.


What are the symptoms of pulmonary stenosis?

If pulmonary stenosis is mild,  or in infants and small children,  it usually doesn't cause any symptoms. As the child gets older many may experience fatigue, shortness of breath, chest pain and even fainting in some instances.


What are pulmonary stenosis care options?

If pulmonary stenosis is mild, no treatment is needed. Others may require heart catheterization or sometimes surgery to make repairs to the defective pulmonary valve.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 3/23/2018 2:06:00 PM

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Nicklaus Children's Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU) is one of the few pediatric CICUs in the nation and the first dedicated pediatric cardiac unit in the Southeast. The cardiac care unit provides highly specialized pre-and post-operative care for children undergoing cardiac surgery and interventional catheterization.


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