Cerebral Palsy

Also known as: CP

What is Cerebral Palsy?

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurological disorder, often as a consequence of events in the early years of life, which affect the neurological function at various levels. Children may have difficulty in moving in a coordinated manner, learning and behavioral problems or seizures. 
 

Causes of Cerebral Palsy

For many cases of cerebral palsy, the cause is not known. Others can be linked to issues during pregnancy that resulted in brain damage or abnormal brain development. Babies born prematurely, particularly those of low birth weight are more likely to have CP than full term babies.

Upcoming Events

Best Practices in Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Symposium

This one day course will include educational sessions, case studies, and panel discussions that highlight evidence-based information for managing Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and other related disabilities for children ages birth to 5.

Learn more and register

Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) Family Conference

Nicklaus Children’s Hospital invites you to attend a conference designed to provide individuals with Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) and their family’s up-to-date information about the possible aspects of BWS and their management. 

Learn more and register

Introduction to Conscious Discipline

This workshop is designed to introduce you to a “better way” by providing an overview of Conscious Discipline® created by Dr. Becky Bailey. You will learn basic information about the human brain and about social emotional intelligence in order to have more tools to discipline your children effectively.

Learn more and register

This page was last updated on: 3/23/2018 1:56:55 PM

From the Newsdesk

BWS Family Conference
07/20/2018 — This conference is designed to provide individuals with Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) and their family’s up-to-date information about the possible aspects of BWS and their management.  
New Device Helps Children with Drug-Resistant Epilepsy Manage Seizures
04/25/2018 — Grant is the first pediatric patient in South Florida to utilize the SenTiva VNS device, which is currently the smallest and lightest responsive therapy for epilepsy available on the market. The device, used in combination with epilepsy medications, has been shown to be effective in reducing seizure frequency and duration.