Aortic Stenosis

Also known as: Aortic valve stenosis, calcific aortic stenosis

What is ​Aortic Stenosis?

The aortic valve separates the heart's left ventricle from the aorta, which takes blood to the rest of the body. When someone has aortic stenosis, the aortic valve doesn't open as wide as it should. This prevents blood from flowing out of the heart at its customary rate.


Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: June 21, 2019 02:16 AM

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Subaortic Membrane Resection

Subaortic membrane resection is a surgery that’s used to repair a medical condition known as subaortic stenosis. With subaortic stenosis, the area just below the aortic valve of the left ventricle is obstructed or narrowed often by excess tissue, which reduces the flow of blood to the body. Learn more

Ross-Konno Procedure

Ross-Konno procedure is a surgery to repair a damaged aortic valve. The aortic valve is responsible for pumping blood from the heart out to the body. The left ventricular outflow tract is also enlarged as part of the Ross-Konno procedure. Learn more