Crouzon Syndrome

Also known as: Craniofacial dysostosis

What is Crouzon syndrome?

Crouzon syndrome is a rare disorder that is present at birth. It is characterized by the seams between a baby’s soft skull bones closing early, which causes the face and eye sockets to develop incorrectly.


What causes Crouzon syndrome? 

Crouzon syndrome is an inherited disorder that is passed along from parents to their children.


What are the symptoms of Crouzon syndrome? 

The physical symptoms of Crouzon syndrome can include an abnormal head shape, wide-set and bulging eyes, and an underdeveloped midface. Vision problems, hearing problems, difficulty breathing and dental issues are also common.
 

What are Crouzon syndrome care options? 

Treating Crouzon syndrome often takes a variety of different treatments and therapies. Surgery to correct the different abnormalities is common, and assistance with breathing can be needed. Vision correction is performed when necessary and children will also often require therapy to correct speech or hearing problems.

Reviewed by: Saoussen Salhi, MD

This page was last updated on: 1/11/2018 1:58:49 PM


Upcoming Events

Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) Family Conference

Nicklaus Children’s Hospital invites you to attend a conference designed to provide individuals with Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) and their family’s up-to-date information about the possible aspects of BWS and their management. 

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Camp Superstar

Camp Superstar is a three-day sleep away camp for children with craniofacial conditions.

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Video

video
Emily was born with Pierre-Robin sequence, a condition present at birth which tends to cause a small jaw, a tongue that is displaced back towards the throat and a cleft palate. She was brought her to Nicklaus Children’s Hospital, where she underwent surgery to repair her cleft palate, and since then her life has completely turned around.


From the Newsdesk

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March Patient of the Month: Theodore
03/15/2018 — Meet our March Patient of the Month, Theodore. Theodore was diagnosed with cleft palate, cleft lip and a heart problem when he was only 18 weeks old. After he was born, Theodore had to be admitted into the NICU to be able to perform the necessary surgeries for him to live a healthy life.