Complete Blood Count

Also known as: CBC.

What is complete blood count?

A complete blood count is a common blood test that’s often taken during physicals or other medical checkups. It provides an evaluation of overall health, and also checks for certain disorders such as infection, anemia, leukemia, immune system disorders and other diseases.

What happens during the procedure?

A routine blood draw is required in order to begin the CBC. The blood sample is then taken to a laboratory for testing and analysis.

Is any special preparation needed?

No special preparation is required.

What are the risk factors?

Local bleeding or trauma at the site where the blood is draw and infection are the main risks factors.


Reviewed by: Steven J. Melnick, PhD, MD

This page was last updated on: December 20, 2019 02:17 PM


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Date: Saturday, July 25, 2020

Camp U.O.T.S. is an annual weeklong, overnight camp for children with cancer and blood disorders who are treated at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital. Learn more.

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