Femoral Anteversion

Also known as: excession femoral anteversion, excessive femoral torsion, pigeon toe, parrot toe

What is femoral anteversion?

The femur is the bone that connects the hip to the knee. When the femur gets twisted inward while the baby is in the uterus, it causes femoral anteversion. This can cause some physical and developmental problems for the newborn baby.

What causes femoral anteversion?

The baby’s position in the uterus can play a role in whether or not femoral anteversion occurs. It also tends to run in families, as some are more likely to get it than others based on family history.

What are the symptoms of femoral anteversion?

The turned femur causes both the knees and feet to turn inward, creating an appearance that’s often described as "pigeon-toed". It may make walking and balancing difficult and cause falls.

What are femoral anteversion care options?

Femoral anteversion usually improves on its own over time. In severe cases, braces may help with the problems related to femoral anteversion.


Reviewed by: Avi Baitner, MD

This page was last updated on: September 09, 2020 11:13 AM

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