Moebius Syndrome

Also known as: Moebius syndrome

What is Moebius syndrome?

Moebius Syndrome is a rare condition which primarily affects the 6th and 7th cranial nerves, leaving those with the condition unable to move their faces (they can’t smile, frown, suck, grimace or blink their eyes) and unable to move their eyes laterally.
 

Characteristics of Moebius Syndrome include:

  • Impaired ability in infants to suck
  • Inability to follow objects with one's eye -- instead the child turns his/her head to follow
  • Lack of facial expression
  • Strabismus (Crossed eyes)
  • Inability to smile
  • Motor delays
  • Hearing problems
  • Speech difficulties

 

What causes Moebius Syndrome?

It is thought to be caused by a vascular disruption early in fetal development.  It is typically a sporadic occurrence, meaning it is not an inherited condition.
 

What is the prognosis?

With close medical attention, the prognosis for most children with this condition is positive.

Reviewed by: Saoussen Salhi, MD

This page was last updated on: 4/23/2018 8:47:38 AM


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