Tricuspid Atresia (TA)

Also known as: TA

What is Tricuspid Atresia?

In the normal heart, the tricuspid valve is the opening that controls the flow of blood between the right atrium (where the blood enters the heart) and the right ventricle (where the blood leaves for the lungs). Tricuspid atresia is a problem with the development of the right side of the heart where this valve has not developed, with a smaller than normal lower right pumping chamber ( right ventricle). Because of this  valve blockage to the flow of blood, the body receives blood with less oxygen in it than it needs. There is usually an associated  hole between the right and left upper chambers of the heart ( right atrium and left atrium ) called an atrial septal defect. 
 

What causes tricuspid atresia? 

Tricuspid atresia is a defect that babies are born with (congenital birth defect). It is often present with other heart problems. The exact cause is not known.
 

What are the symptoms of tricuspid atresia? 

Babies with tricuspid atresia will have a bluish or purple tint to their lips, skin and nails, shortness of breath, feed poorly, and be extremely fatigued.
 

What are tricuspid atresia care options? 

Surgery is required to repair this defect as soon as possible. The baby may be given oxygen and a medicine called prostaglandin E1 to keep blood going to the lungs and require a breathing machine or ventilator  before the surgery.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 1/10/2017 2:40:46 PM

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