Congenitally Corrected Transposition of the Great Arteries (CCTGA)

Also known as: CCTGA, corrected transposition of the great arteries

What is ​Congenitally Corrected Transposition of the Great Arteries (CCTGA)?

In a normal heart the left ventricle ( the stronger pumping chamber ) sends blood through the aorta to the rest of the body. The right sided pumping chamber ( the right ventricle ) pumps blood to the lungs. In Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries is a birth defect that impacts the heart. Specifically, the two lower chambers of the heart, the ventricles, are reversed in position, so the weaker right ventricle is on the left pumping blood to the body and the stronger left ventricle pumps blood to the lungs. The valves that allow blood to flow between heart chambers are also reversed.


What causes congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries? 

Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries occurs as a baby’s heart develops. The exact cause is not known. Research indicates that it may have something to do with both genetics and environmental factors.


What are the symptoms of congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries? 

Symptoms vary widely. Sometimes they occur after birth ; In many cases, the heart works as normal for a long time, even to adulthood, and the condition does not cause any symptoms. Other times, children have abnormal heart rhythm, fatigue and other signs of heart failure or heart murmur.


What are congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries care options? 

If no symptoms are present and no other heart defects exist, no treatment may be needed for congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries. Other times, surgery might be required to repair the heart and any related abnormalities.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 1/10/2017 3:27:27 PM

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