Radioulnar Synostosis

Also known as: radio-ulnar synostosis, congenital radioulnar synostosis

What is radioulnar synostosis?

The radius and ulna are the two bones that make up the forearm. When a child has abnormal connection between these two bones, it is known as radioulnar synostosis.


What causes radioulnar synostosis?

In many cases, the cause of radioulnar synostosis is not entirely clear. It can be due to a genetic mutation, and in some cases it is hereditary and can be passed down from parents to children. In some cases, radioulnar synostosis can develop as a result of trauma or other conditions.


What are the symptoms of radioulnar synostosis?

The abnormal connection between the bones can cause pain and challenges with moving the forearm. A child may have trouble rotating the arm, have the elbow positioned at an abnormal angle or have a forearm that’s shorter than usual.


What are radioulnar synostosis care options?

Many cases of radioulnar synostosis do not require specific treatment. Sometimes, occupational therapy may be recommended to help improve function. If the position of the forearm is such that it causes problems with daily living, surgery to remove the connection and reposition the forearm is a possibility.

Reviewed by: Scott J Schoenleber, MD

This page was last updated on: 10/12/2017 5:07:27 PM

From the Newsdesk

Harper's Success Story
08/31/2017 — When Harper was diagnosed with Beckwith Wiedemann Syndrome shortly after birth, her family knew they wanted the best team possible for her tongue reduction surgery. Harper now leads a limitless life thanks to Dr. Chad Perlyn, an expert in treating macroglossia, and the Craniofacial Center at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital.
Harper's Success Story
08/31/2017 — When Harper was diagnosed with Beckwith Wiedemann Syndrome shortly after birth, her family knew they wanted the best team possible for her tongue reduction surgery. Harper now leads a limitless life thanks to Dr. Chad Perlyn, an expert in treating macroglossia, and the Craniofacial Center at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital.