Complete Atrioventricular Canal Repair

Also known as: complete AV canal repair.

What is complete AV canal repair?

A complete atrioventricular canal defect is a birth defect in which the heart doesn’t develop properly. It’s characterized by a hole in the center of the heart that allows blood from all four chambers to mix and not flow through the heart properly. Complete atrioventricular (AV) canal repair is a surgery to fix this defect.
 

What happens during the procedure?

Complete AV canal repair is an open-heart surgery. The fix may require patches to plug parts of the hole in the heart, as well as additional work to rebuild valves between the heart chambers.
 

Is any special preparation needed?

Complete AV canal repair is typically done during the first six months of life. Your child will have several tests done and will need to take medications to manage symptoms prior to the procedure. Your child will also need to avoid food and drink for a period of time before the procedure.
 

What are the risk factors?

Risk factors of complete AV canal repair include infection, fluid buildup, bleeding, abnormal heart rhythm, problems with the nervous system, as well as a chance that the repair is not successful.

Complete AV canal repair at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital: Complete AV canal repairs are performed by Nicklaus Children’s Hospital’s team of top-notch pediatric heart surgeons using the newest techniques.

Reviewed by: Robert L Hannan, MD

This page was last updated on: 7/25/2018 9:07:59 AM

From the Newsdesk

August Patient of the Month: Luife
While he was still inside his mother’s womb, Luife was diagnosed with transposition of the great arteries, a congenital heart defect. Shortly after birth, Luife was taken by ambulance to the cardiac team at Nicklaus Children’s. The pediatric cardiology team took Luife’s heart apart, piece by delicate piece, and successfully, put it back together. Today, Luife is a healthy, active and outgoing 8-year-old boy who wears his “Scar of Honor” with pride. 
August Patient of the Month: Luife
While he was still inside his mother’s womb, Luife was diagnosed with transposition of the great arteries, a congenital heart defect. Shortly after birth, Luife was taken by ambulance to the cardiac team at Nicklaus Children’s. The pediatric cardiology team took Luife’s heart apart, piece by delicate piece, and successfully, put it back together. Today, Luife is a healthy, active and outgoing 8-year-old boy who wears his “Scar of Honor” with pride. 

Video

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Once the Heart Program Team team met with Teegan and her family, the doctors realized that this was a case unlike any they had seen before.
From before birth she had been diagnosed with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and then they realized that she had a little less than half a heart and only one lung. 

This is the story of how the Heart Program at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital, determined to repair Teegan’s heart, used innovative techniques to figure out the best way to treat Teegan’s condition.