Botox Injections

Also known as: botulinum toxin A, botulinum toxin.

What are Botox injections?

A Botox injection is an injection of botulinum toxin (which causes temporary paralysis) into a muscle to relieve spasticity and involuntary movements.


What happens during the procedure?

A local anesthetic (in cream form) is applied to the skin 1-2 hours before the procedure which allows for painless small needle insertion. Sedation is usually not required. Botox is injected into the muscle which only takes a few minutes. After a short observation period your child will be able to go back to normal activities.


Is any special preparation needed?

No special preparations are usually required. Your specialist pediatrician will discuss any special circumstances related to your child.


What are the risk factors?

Injections are usually tolerated without significant side effects. There may be spots of blood at the injections sites and sometimes the muscle weakness may be more than expected. Serious side effects are rare, but the botulinum toxin can spread to other parts of the body causing other muscles to weaken. This can result in hoarseness, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, blurred vision and others difficulties.


Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 11/9/2018 11:21:53 AM

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