Types of Brain Tumors in Children

The clinical team has experience in addressing the care needs of children with virtually any type of brain tumor, including the following:

Anaplastic Astrocytoma

Astrocytes cells are a diverse group of cells which play many roles in the brain, but particularly form the physical and physiological supportive system for the brain’s neurons. Astrocytomas are tumors that grow from these cells and make up almost 50% of childhood brain tumors, frequently occurring in children between 5-9 years of age. Learn more

Astrocytoma

An Astrocytoma is a form of brain tumor (benign or cancerous), that develops in the cells that form the supportive tissue of the brain. Learn more

Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor

An atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor, is a fairly rare aggressive tumor usually diagnosed in young children that forms in the tissues of the Central Nervous System. Learn more

Choroid Plexus Brain Tumor

The choroid plexus is the tissue that lies in the cavities of the brain (called ventricles and there are four of them) that creates the fluid (cerebrospinal fluid) which surrounds and cushions the brain and spinal cord. Learn more

Craniopharyngioma

A craniopharyngioma is a non-cancerous brain tumor that develops from cells present during early brain development, and in childhood frequently presents between the ages of 5-14 years. Learn more

Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG)

Tumors that start in the glial tissue at the base of the brain in the brainstem area (which controls breathing, heart rate and blood pressure plus other functions) called the Pons, just above the back of the neck, are called diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. Learn more

Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumor

Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors are rare, slow growing, non-spreading growths, found in children and teens, that develop from different types of abnormal central nervous system brain cells. Learn more

Embryonal Brain Tumors

Embryonic (fetal) cells are a type of brain cell that remains in the brain after birth and while embryonic tumors can occur at any age they most often happen in babies and young children. Learn more

Ependymoma

Ependymal cells form the lining of the ventricles in the brain and the central canal of the spinal cord. Tumors that develop from these cells, are called ependymomas. Learn more

Ganglioglioma

Please see Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumor for further information.

Germinoma of the Central Nervous system

A germinoma is a rare form of cancer that is most often found in the brain of children between the ages of 10 and 19 years. Learn more

Glioblastoma Multiforme

Glioblastoma multiforme are high-grade 1V, aggressively growing, cancerous glial tumors which infiltrate into healthy adjacent brain tissue, frequently occurring in both boys and girls aged 5-10 years. Learn more

Glioma

Glioma is a form of cancer that develops from glial cells of the brain - those cells which support and nourish the neurons. Learn more

Gliomatosis Cerebri

Astrocytes are star-shaped cells that are part of a glial network of supportive and nourishing tissue within the brain. One rare form of malignant tumor that grows and infiltrates aggressively from these cells and which spreads over the top and throughout the brain is known as gliomatosis cerebri. Learn more

Hereditary Paraganglioma-Pheochromocytoma Syndrome

Children with hereditary paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma syndrome are often under frequent monitoring due to their high risk of developing cancer. The presence of the tumors, often in large numbers, is the primary sign of this disease. Learn more

Li-Fraumeni Syndrome

Li-Fraumeni syndrome is a genetic disorder that increases the risk of getting certain forms of cancer in children and adults. Learn more

Low-Grade Gliomas

Glioma is a form of cancer that develops in the glial cells of the brain. Learn more

Malignant Glioma

Gliomas are tumors formed from cells (glial cells) that hold the nerve cells in the brain in place, protect them and provide them with food and oxygen. Gliomas are divided into four grades of severity (1-1V) depending on the tumor cells’ appearance. The higher the grade the more severe the glioma. Learn more

Medulloblastoma

Of cancerous brain tumors that can affect children, medulloblastoma is the most common. They represent about 20 percent if childhood brain tumors, particularly in children between the ages of 3 and 8 years, with boys affected more than girls. Learn more

Meningioma

A meningioma is a relatively uncommon childhood tumor that grows from the middle of the three membranes layers that cover the brain and spinal cord. Learn more

Oligodendroglioma

Oligodendroglioma is a type of brain tumor that affects the glial tissue of the brain. Learn more

Optic Pathway Glioma

Glioma is a specific type of slow growing tumor that starts in one of the cells of the brain or spinal cord. When this tumor grows on or around the visual system it is known as an optic pathway glioma. Learn more

Pilocytic Astrocytoma

An astrocytoma is a type of brain tumor glioma, and pilocytic astrocytomas are a family of slow-growing, mostly noncancerous (non spreading-grades 1 and 11) tumors from glial cells. Learn more

Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma

Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma is a rare brain tumor that grows in the upper parts of the brain (cerebral hemispheres) from brain cells called astrocytes (a type of glioma), which form the brain’s supportive and nutritional network. Learn more

Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors (PNET)

Primitive neuroectodermal tumors are a group of cancers (malignant) that start in nerve cells formed in the fetus during early development that haven't developed the way they should have. Learn more

Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma is the most common solid cancerous tumor found outside the brain in children. Learn more

Spinal Cord Tumors

A tumor that grows in the tissues around, or spreads from a different site to the spinal cord region, it is known as a spinal cord tumor. Learn more

Tectal Gliomas

A tectal glioma ( from a type of glial cell that nourishes and supports other brain cells) is a slow growing, generally benign (non spreading), brain tumor in children 3-16 years of age, situated in the upper portion or roof of the brain stem ( this area of the brain controls important body functions like breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure). Learn more