Neuromuscular Scoliosis

Also known as: scoliosis, curvature of the spine

What is neuromuscular scoliosis?

Scoliosis is a medical condition in which the spine is curved in an unusual manner, which can lead to other complications. When this curvature is caused by problems related to the spinal cord, the brain or the muscles of the body, it can be classified as neuromuscular scoliosis.


What causes neuromuscular scoliosis?

Another medical condition that impacts the muscles, brain or spinal cord is the cause of neuromuscular scoliosis. A wide variety of conditions can lead to neuromuscular scoliosis, including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, Friedreich ataxia, and several other conditions.


What are the symptoms of neuromuscular scoliosis?

Along with the curved spine, people with neuromuscular scoliosis typically have problems with balance, coordination, sitting and maintaining good hygiene, among other complications. Pain with neuromuscular scoliosis is rare, but the scoliosis does tend to continue to worsen more over time with neuromuscular scoliosis than with other forms of scoliosis.


What are neuromuscular scoliosis care options?

Braces, a well fitted wheelchair, physical therapy and a procedure that involves the insertion of rods to help the spine grow straight are all possible treatments for neuromuscular scoliosis. In most cases, a child will need spinal fusion surgery to address the problems as they grow older.

Reviewed by: Stephen Graham George Jr., MD

This page was last updated on: 4/9/2018 10:46:28 AM

Video screen capture of What are the different types of scoliosis?
Dr. Stephen George, pediatric spine surgeon explains about the different types of scoliosis.

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