Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Also known as: EEE, triple E.

What is eastern equine encephalitis?

Eastern equine encephalitis is a rare but serious viral infection that causes inflammation in the brain, or encephalitis.
 

What causes eastern equine encephalitis? 

A virus known as the eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is the direct cause of the illness. The virus is spread by mosquitoes infected with the virus. It cannot be spread directly from person to person or from animal to person.
 

What are the symptoms of eastern equine encephalitis? 

The symptoms of eastern equine encephalitis can begin with headache, chills, vomiting and high fever. Over time, the disease progresses to include seizures, disorientation, brain inflammation and coma.
 

What are eastern equine encephalitis care options?

People who develop eastern equine encephalitis will need supportive care in the form of hospitalization, breathing support, IV fluids and other methods of care. Taking steps to prevent mosquito bites can help prevent the disease from occurring.

Reviewed by: Otto M Ramos, MD

This page was last updated on: 6/12/2018 11:00:44 AM


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