Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

Also known as: NBCCS, Gorlin syndrome

What is nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome?

Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is a genetic disorder that impacts several areas of the body. The common problems associated with the disease include an increased risk of skin cancer or tumors, a unique facial appearance and problems with the bones, endocrine glands, nervous system and other areas of the body.
 

What causes nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome?

Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is the result of a genetic mutation. The disease is hereditary and passed down from parents to children.
 

What are the symptoms of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome?

Symptoms of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome include unusual facial features such as wide-set eyes, a protruding brow, a broad nose and cleft palate, among others. People with the disease also have an increased risk of developing skin cancer and other types of tumors.
 

What are nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome care options?

People with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome are under frequent observation to check for the signs of skin cancer. Certain complications of the disease can be treated by other specialists, depending on what organ systems are involved.

Reviewed by: Paul A Cardenas, MD

This page was last updated on: 7/4/2018 8:46:30 AM

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