Esophageal Atresia

Also known as: EA.

What is esophageal atresia?

When a fetus’s esophagus, the tube that carries food to the stomach, does not develop correctly, the defect is known as esophageal atresia. This birth defect is often present with others, including a bad connection between the esophagus and windpipe (known as tracheoesophageal fistula). These defects can cause a number of problems.

 

What causes esophageal atresia?

Researchers aren’t sure exactly what causes esophageal atresia. There appears to be a genetic component to the birth defect.

 

What are the symptoms of esophageal atresia?

Babies with esophageal atresia have trouble feeding and breathing. This leads to drooling, coughing, gagging, choking and a bluish color when babies try to feed and occasionally difficulty breathing.   

 

What are esophageal atresia care options?

Surgery is needed to repair esophageal atresia as soon as possible after birth. A baby will need to be fed by IV nutrition until the surgery can take place.


 

Reviewed by: Shifra A Koyfman, MD

This page was last updated on: 2/3/2018 4:56:14 PM


Upcoming Events

Ventilation Assisted Children's Center (VACC) Camp

VACC Camp is a week-long sleep-away camp for children requiring ventilator assistance (tracheostomy ventilator, C-PAP, BiPAP, or oxygen to support breathing) and their families.  Learn more.

Register Online

9th Annual Dr. Moises Simpser VACC Camp Golf Tournament

Join us for a great day of golf, delicious dinner and exciting auction...all to benefit the children of VACC Camp. Learn more.

From the Newsdesk

Dental Health in Children with Asthma
The medications that an asthmatic child uses could have effects on the oral mucosa.
 
July Patient of the Month: Justin
The moment Justin was born, his mother and father were faced with the most daunting and challenging experience any parent can imagine. Just hours after birth, Justin was airlifted to Nicklaus Children’s Hospital for more specialized pediatric care. Having been diagnosed with pulmonary atresia and tetralogy of Fallot, he required immediate attention before it was too late.

Video

video
At just 17 years old, Tonaly was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis, a condition that kept her in the hospital for almost three months. Thanks to the treatment she received at Nicklaus Children’s, Tonaly no longer experiences the strong pains she once did, and with the help of Lisa, she developed the strength to face her condition head-on.