Metopic Synostosis

Also known as: trigonocephaly metopic ridge, metopic suture craniosynostosis

What is metopic synostosis?

The skull of an infant is made up of several bony plates that are joined together by fibrous (scar-like) tissue called sutures. One of these sutures is situated in the middle of the forehead running from the top of the head to the top of the nose, and is called the metopic suture. Normally these sutures close over time. When closure of this suture occurs earlier than it should, it’s known as metopic synostosis.
 

What causes metopic synostosis? 

In most infants, the exact cause is not known. It can however be associated with a number of rare genetic conditions, such as Baller-Gerold syndrome, Jacobsen syndrome, Muenke syndrome and others.
 

What are the signs/symptoms of metopic synostosis? 

A common sign is a visible ridge running down the middle of the forehead with a triangular pointed shaped skull (trigonocephaly), a narrow forehead, eyes that seem too close together and a wide, flat back of skull.
 

What are metopic synostosis care options? 

Mild cases may require no treatment. Others may require surgery to treat symptoms and prevent complications.


This page was last updated on: 6/12/2018 11:00:42 AM

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