Metopic Synostosis

Also known as: trigonocephaly metopic ridge, metopic suture craniosynostosis

What is metopic synostosis?

The skull of an infant is made up of several bony plates that are joined together by fibrous (scar-like) tissue called sutures. One of these sutures is situated in the middle of the forehead running from the top of the head to the top of the nose, and is called the metopic suture. Normally these sutures close over time. When closure of this suture occurs earlier than it should, it’s known as metopic synostosis.

 

What causes metopic synostosis? 

In most infants, the exact cause is not known. It can however be associated with a number of rare genetic conditions, such as Baller-Gerold syndrome, Jacobsen syndrome, Muenke syndrome and others.

 

What are the signs/symptoms of metopic synostosis? 

A common sign is a visible ridge running down the middle of the forehead with a triangular pointed shaped skull (trigonocephaly), a narrow forehead, eyes that seem too close together and a wide, flat back of skull.

 

What are metopic synostosis care options? 

Mild cases may require no treatment. Others may require surgery to treat symptoms and prevent complications.


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Communication and Feeding Difficulties in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

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This page was last updated on: 3/23/2018 2:19:12 PM



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Emily was born with Pierre-Robin sequence, a condition present at birth which tends to cause a small jaw, a tongue that is displaced back towards the throat and a cleft palate. She was brought her to Nicklaus Children’s Hospital, where she underwent surgery to repair her cleft palate, and since then her life has completely turned around.

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04/30/2018 — Children who receive care at the Craniofacial Center at Nicklaus Children’s, along with their families, enjoyed an afternoon of red carpet glamour and photo booth fun on April 28.