Congenital Hand Malformation

Also known as: Congenital hand deformities, congenital hand anomalies, congenital hand differences

What are congenital hand malformations?

Any problem with the hands that develops in a fetus while it’s still in the uterus is known as a congenital hand malformation. They can range from minor finger problems to severe deformities that can include the bones being absent from the hand.
 

What causes congenital hand malformations?

The cause of many congenital hand malformations is not known. There appears to be a genetic component to the disorders. In some cases, they can run in families and be passed along from parents to children.
 

What are the symptoms of congenital hand malformations?

Symptoms of congenital hand malformations can vary widely from fingers being a slightly unusual size to severe problems such as parts of the hand not separating properly, missing muscles or bones or the complete absence of a finger or fingers.
 

What are congenital hand malformations care options?

In some cases, the malformation can be corrected with gradual manipulation, stretching, splinting or bracing. Occupational therapy can sometimes help children use their hands properly. In more severe cases, corrective surgery may be an option, or prosthetics can help children function better.

Reviewed by: Saoussen Salhi, MD

This page was last updated on: 3/23/2018 2:19:06 PM


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