Pulmonary Regurgitation

Also known as: PR, pulmonic regurgitation, pulmonary incompetence, pulmonary insufficiency

What is Pulmonary Regurgitation?

The pulmonary valve controls the flow of blood from the heart out to the lungs. When this valve leaks, it allows blood to flow backward into the heart before it can travel to the lungs. This leak is known as pulmonary regurgitation and it can be categorized as mild, moderate or severe.


What causes pulmonary regurgitation?

It is also often a complication of other heart problems, such as congenital heart disease,  rheumatic fever, infective endocarditis, pulmonary hypertension and others.


What are the symptoms of pulmonary regurgitation?

Early on there may be no symptoms, however on examination a sound ( called a murmur ) may be heard between heart beats. As the condition progresses heart fatigue, lightheadedness, fainting and chest pain can occur.


What are pulmonary regurgitation care options?

Treatments are usually directed to the underlying cause. As Pulmonary regurgitation is often related to pulmonary hypertension, medications that help with pulmonary hypertension will also improve the problems with the pulmonary valve. In some cases, surgery to repair the valve might be needed.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 1/11/2018 1:53:05 PM

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