Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS)

Also known as: POTS

What is postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome?

Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is a form of rapid heartbeat that occurs when an individual moves from a sitting or lying position to a standing position. It’s related to problems with blood flow and can cause lightheadedness or fainting among other symptoms.

What causes postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome?

The direct cause of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is not enough blood returning to the heart when a person moves from sitting or lying to standing up. Why this occurs in some is unclear, however, it might be related to nerve, circulation or blood pressure issues, among others. Some people have a family history of the disease, while others do not.

What are the symptoms of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome?

Symptoms of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome include lightheadedness, dizziness, fainting, blurred vision, fatigue, shortness of breath, heart palpitations, headache and others.

What are postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome care options?

In mild cases, diet and lifestyle changes can improve the condition. Others may require medication to help with circulation and blood flow.


Reviewed by: Anthony F. Rossi, MD

This page was last updated on: 6/12/2018 1:55:07 PM

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