Interruption of the Aortic Arch (IAA)

Also known as: interrupted aortic arch, IAA

What is ​Interruption of the Aortic Arch (IAA)?

As the aorta carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body, it arches upward before bending around and down. When blood flow is cut off at any point along this arch, it is known as interruption of the aortic arch or an interrupted aortic arch (IAA).


What causes interruption of the aortic arch?

Interruption of the aortic arch appears to be a genetic disorder. It occurs during fetal development, and infants that have it often have other heart defects, as well.


What are the symptoms of interruption of the aortic arch?

Signs and symptoms of interruption of the aortic arch usually occur soon after birth, frequently presenting with a heart murmur, a rapid heart rate, gray and cold feet and legs, shortness of breath, problems with feeding, and being more sleepy and unresponsive than normal.


What are interruption of the aortic arch care options?

Interruption of the aortic arch is typically treated with surgery to repair the problems of the aorta, as well as other related heart problems.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 1/11/2018 1:49:49 PM

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Once the cardiac team met with Teegan and her family, the doctors realized that this was a case unlike any they had seen before. From before birth she had been diagnosed with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and then they realized that she had a little less than half a heart and only one lung. Teegan's doctors and her parents knew she had a long road to recovery, but they were prepared to do whatever it takes to get her there.


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