Aortic Stenosis

Also known as: Aortic valve stenosis, calcific aortic stenosis

What is ​Aortic Stenosis?

The aortic valve separates the heart’s left ventricle from the aorta, which takes blood to the rest of the body. When someone has aortic stenosis, the aortic valve doesn’t open as wide as it should. This prevents blood from flowing out of the heart at its customary rate.
 

What causes aortic stenosis? 

In most children the cause isn't known. In some cases, aortic regurgitation occurs as the result of a birth defect. Other times, calcium deposits over time cause the valve to become more narrow (calcific aortic stenosis). Finally, some diseases, such as rheumatic fever, cause aortic stenosis as a complication.
 

What are the symptoms of aortic stenosis? 

Many children will have no symptoms. Possible symptoms of aortic stenosis include chest pain or discomfort, fatigue or breathing problems, coughing, fainting, weakness or dizziness.
 

What are aortic stenosis care options? 

Medications can be used to treat the symptoms of aortic stenosis. Surgery or a procedure called balloon valvuloplasty can also be used to repair the valve.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 6/12/2018 11:17:33 AM

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