Aortic Regurgitation

Also known as: Aortic valve regurgitation

What is ​Aortic Regurgitation?

The aortic valve separates the heart’s left ventricle from the aorta, which takes blood to the rest of the body. When someone has aortic regurgitation, the aortic valve leaks and allows blood to flow back into the left ventricle, which can cause a number of problems. 


What causes aortic regurgitation? 

In some cases, aortic regurgitation occurs as the result of a birth defect. Other times, another disease, such as rheumatic fever or rheumatoid arthritis, can cause problems that eventually lead to aortic regurgitation.


What are the symptoms of aortic regurgitation? 

Mild aortic regurgitation may have no symptoms. As it gets worse, the heart has to pump harder, which can lead to heart palpitations, chest pain and dizziness. Heart failure is possible in severe cases.


What are aortic regurgitation care options? 

Mild cases are often treated with medications. More severe cases of aortic regurgitation may require surgical repair.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 3/23/2018 2:05:30 PM

From the Newsdesk

March Patient of the Month: Theodore
03/15/2018 — Meet our March Patient of the Month, Theodore. Theodore was diagnosed with cleft palate, cleft lip and a heart problem when he was only 18 weeks old. After he was born, Theodore had to be admitted into the NICU to be able to perform the necessary surgeries for him to live a healthy life.
March Patient of the Month: Theodore
03/15/2018 — Meet our March Patient of the Month, Theodore. Theodore was diagnosed with cleft palate, cleft lip and a heart problem when he was only 18 weeks old. After he was born, Theodore had to be admitted into the NICU to be able to perform the necessary surgeries for him to live a healthy life.