Thrombophilia

Also known as: acquired thrombophilia, inherited thrombophilia, hypercoagulable state

What is thrombophilia?

Thrombophilia is an abnormality of the normal blood clotting mechanisms. This increases the chance of blood vessels clotting (thrombosis) anywhere in the body (arteries and veins). Infants commonly present with Thrombophilia in the first six months of life. There are two types of Thrombophilia-Genetic inherited and acquired where the clotting abnormality is related to some other disease process.
 

What causes thrombophilia?

Thromboses in children has many causes. In some, thrombophilia is a genetic disorder that is inherited from the parents. In others, cancer, cardiac disease, a catheter in a vessel, an antibody which is found to enhance clotting, obesity, immobility, and trauma are common causes. In older adolescents smoking and oral contraceptive use increase clotting risk.
 

What are the symptoms of thrombophilia?

Symptoms depend on the size and position of the clot. If a clot forms and gets lodged in a vein, it can cause symptoms such as pain and swelling, chest pain, trouble breathing or even severe complications like heart attack or stroke.
 

What are thrombophilia care options?

Treatment depends on the cause-frequently anticoagulants (medicines which act against clotting), medicines to breakup the clot/s and/or the replacement of substances that control clotting are used. Again, depending on the cause of the clotting, treatments might be needed for either a short or long period of time.

Reviewed by: Maggie Eidson Fader, MD

This page was last updated on: 5/24/2018 10:58:25 AM

From the Newsdesk

Siblings of Cancer Patients enjoy a Fun Filled Day
More than two dozen children attended the Bear Hug camp at Nicklaus Children's last week. This day camp is for siblings of pediatric cancer patients to encourage socialization among peers and help them gain insight on their siblings' care journey. 
Daniella Celebrates her Ninth Birthday by Advocating for Children’s Health
On this very same day nine years ago, Daniella Alvarez was diagnosed Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor (ATRT), a rare and aggressive type of brain cancer. The news came on June 26, 2009, her second birthday. Daniella endured years of brain surgeries, aggressive chemotherapies, radiation, imaging scans, multiple visits to intensive care at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital. She is now cancer free thanks to a pediatric clinical trial made possible through research funding.

Video

video
Meet our July Patient of the Month, Lacy. Lacy was only 2 years old when her parents noticed that something was wrong. They took her to various doctors to try to find what could be the cause, Lacy had an 8 cm. tumor in her brain, occupying most of the lower part of her head.