Osteochondroma

Also known as: Exostosis.

What is osteochondroma?

An osteochondroma is a common non-cancerous tumor of bone that typically grows near the growth plate, the area of cartilage near the ends of the long bones (knee and upper arm).

The tumor stops growing when puberty is completed and is usually found in boys.

What causes osteochondroma? 

The cause is unknown but may be related to a genetic mutation.

What are the symptoms of osteochondroma? 

Most osteochondromas do not cause any concerning problems. A child may notice a bump or have pain. If large, a tumor may press on nerves or blood vessels causing pain, numbness, tingling or changes in blood flow of the affected limb.

What are osteochondroma care options? 

Most osteochondromas don't require treatment, only requiring monitoring to make sure that they don’t become problematic over time. Surgical removal is only necessary if the osteochondroma grows large enough to cause complications.


Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 11/14/2017 9:19:30 AM

From the Newsdesk

Remote Controlled Transport Cars at Nicklaus Children's
11/09/2017 — Remote controlled transport cars are used to provide a positive experience for young children who are being taken into surgery at Nicklaus Children's Hospital.
Strength Training in the Adolescent Population
10/09/2017 — Exercise is the physical exertion of the body - making the body perform a physical activity which results in a healthy or healthier level of physical such as cardiovascular exercise (aerobic and anaerobic), strength/resistance training, balance and proprioception training, etc.