Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

Also known as: MEN1, multiple endocrine adenomatosis, Werner’s syndrome.

What is multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1?

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is a disease that affects several glands throughout the body, including the thyroid, parathyroid and pituitary gland. It causes tumors in these glands and also imbalances in the hormones that the glands produce. The pancreas and small intestine are also impacted by the disease.

What causes multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1?

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is the result of a genetic mutation. The disease is passed down from parents to children.

What are the symptoms of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1?

The tumors that are typical of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 lead to hormone imbalances, which in turn produce symptoms such as kidney stones, bone loss, bone pain, constipation, indigestion, fatigue and other symptoms. Though the tumors are usually benign, they can increase the risk of cancer developing over time.

What are multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 care options?

Surgery to remove the tumor is often the recommended treatment for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Medications can also help with many of the symptoms related to the disease.

Surveillance with ultrasound or MRI can be offered in the Cancer Genetics Clinic in order to detect any such tumors at an early stage if they ever develop.


Reviewed by: Ziad A Khatib, MD

This page was last updated on: 5/23/2018 2:59:27 PM

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