Hepatoblastoma

Also known as: Pediatric hepatoblastoma, childhood liver cancer.

What is hepatoblastoma?

A hepatoblastoma is a rare tumor (cancerous- spreads) that grows from the cells of the liver. It’s the most common of liver cancers in childhood, occurring during the first 18 months of life (infants to 5 years of age), in mostly white children, boys, and those born prematurely of low birth weight.

What causes hepatoblastoma? 
While the cause is unknown, certain genetic (familial adenomatous polyposis, Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome) and other medical conditions can put children at a greater risk of getting hepatoblastoma (e.g. hemihyperplasia, hepatitis B infection, biliary atresia).

What are the signs/symptoms of hepatoblastoma?
Signs and symptoms depend on the size of the tumor and whether or not it has spread. They include; a lump in the liver, a swollen abdomen, fever, weight loss, vomiting, reduced appetite, jaundice with yellow skin and eyes, itchiness and/or pale skin color (anemia), and back pain.

What are hepatoblastoma care options?
Treatments include surgery and one or more types of chemotherapy.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 5/23/2018 2:23:22 PM


Upcoming Events

AYA Game Night

The Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Program at the Nicklaus Children's Cancer Center invites oncology patients 14 years of age and older to this fun event. Food and beverages will be provided. Learn more.

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January Patient of the Month: Layla
When Layla was 5, she came to Nicklaus Children's Hospital with a severe case of scoliosis. To help straighten her spine, Layla spent time in halo gravity traction. While her mom returned home to Gainesville for work and school, the nurses at Nicklaus Children's took care of Layla, acting as substitute mothers and making sure she was well cared for.
January Patient of the Month: Layla
When Layla was 5, she came to Nicklaus Children's Hospital with a severe case of scoliosis. To help straighten her spine, Layla spent time in halo gravity traction. While her mom returned home to Gainesville for work and school, the nurses at Nicklaus Children's took care of Layla, acting as substitute mothers and making sure she was well cared for.