Ewing sarcoma

Also known as: Soft tissue tumors, Askin tumor, peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor

What is Ewing sarcoma?

Ewing sarcoma is a rare type of cancer that usually develops in the bones or soft tissue around the bones (cartilage/nerves) of children 10-20 years of age. The pelvis, femur, ribs, or shoulders are often where they start.

What causes Ewing sarcoma?
The cause of Ewing sarcoma is not entirely clear. It doesn't appear to run in families but probably occurs following a gene mutation from exposure to harmful environmental factors (chemicals, radiation etc.).

What are the signs and symptoms of Ewing sarcoma?
Pain, fever and swelling for a long time where the tumor presents; bone breaks without a reason, difficulty with bladder control, and tiredness and weight loss may be presenting features.

What are Ewing sarcoma care options?
Treatment for Ewing sarcoma may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or some combination of these treatments.

This page was last updated on: 5/23/2018 11:13:28 AM


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