Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma

Also known as: ASPS, ASP sarcoma, alveolar sarcoma of soft parts

What is alveolar soft part sarcoma?

Alveolar soft part sarcoma, or ASPS, is a very rare cancer (sarcoma type) that grows slowly from the connective tissue (the part of an organ that holds the functioning cell together) that usually occurs in children and young adults. As the abnormality only occurs in tumor cells it isn't passed on and it isn't found in other family members. It can however spread to other parts of the body, often to the lungs, brain and bone.

What causes alveolar soft part sarcoma?
The exact mechanism is not clear however it appears to result from the breaking and joining of two chromosomes (X and chromosome 17).
 

What are the symptoms of alveolar soft part sarcoma?

ASPS may present as a painless lump in the leg or buttocks. Often it doesn’t present with any symptom until the cancer has spread. When it grows it can cause pain by stretching or compressing nerves and muscles which can lead to difficulty moving. As it moves to the lungs for example, symptoms can include chest pain, cough, fluid in the lungs and headaches.

What are alveolar soft part sarcoma care options?
 ASPS treatment may involve surgical removal of the tumor, radiation as well as chemotherapy.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 5/23/2018 10:18:59 AM


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