Viral Encephalitis

Also known as: encephalitis.

What is viral encephalitis?

If the brain becomes infected and inflamed, this condition is often known as encephalitis. In most cases it causes flu-like symptoms and is fairly mild, but it can become life-threatening in rare instances.

What causes viral encephalitis?

A viral infection is the cause of viral encephalitis. Enterovirus, West Nile, Herpes, Epstein-Barr, varicella zoster and more are just a few of many viruses that cause viral encephalitis.

What are the symptoms of viral encephalitis?

Symptoms such as aches, fatigue, fever, neck pain, and headaches can occur with encephalitis. It can also lead to seizures, muscle weakness, double vision or other problems related to mental faculties.

What are viral encephalitis care options?

Some cases of encephalitis can be managed with antiviral drugs. In other instances, supportive care such as rest, fluids and over-the-counter pain relievers may be needed until the infection passes. Some may require hospital care in severe instances.


Reviewed by: Anuj Jayakar, MD

This page was last updated on: 7/30/2018 8:20:13 AM

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