Glioblastoma Multiforme

Also known as: glioblastoma, GBM.

What is glioblastoma multiforme?

Glial cells are non-neuronal cells that create a network of supportive and protective tissue for neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system.
Glioblastoma multiforme are high-grade 1V, aggressively growing, cancerous glial tumors which infiltrate into healthy adjacent brain tissue, frequently occurring in both boys and girls aged 5-10 years.
While most develop in the cerebral hemispheres which control speech, movement, thought and sensation, they can also grow in areas of the brain that affect temperature, pain, touch, and parts that control balance and motor function.
 

What causes glioblastoma multiforme? 

There is no known cause for glioblastoma multiforme, however they occur more often in families with some genetic hereditary conditions.

What are the symptoms of glioblastoma multiforme? 

Symptoms of glioblastoma multiforme can include headache, seizures,  tiredness, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, and depending on the position of the tumor, weakness, problems with walking, and problems with speech, memory, vision, hormonal and changes in behavior.
 

What are glioblastoma multiforme care options? 

Glioblastoma multiforme can increase pressure on the brain, so the first steps in treatment may be to relieve this pressure and remove as much of the tumor as possible. A combination of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy is frequently used to manage glioblastoma multiforme.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 2/8/2018 3:48:45 PM

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