Choroid Plexus Brain Tumor

Also known as: choroid plexus tumor, CPT, choroid plexus papilloma, atypical choroid plexus papilloma, choroid plexus carcinoma.

What are choroid plexus brain tumor?

The choroid plexus is the tissue that lies in the cavities of the brain (called ventricles and there are four of them) that creates the fluid (cerebrospinal fluid) which surrounds and cushions the brain and spinal cord. In children, tumors of the choroid plexus are rare, overwhelmingly benign papillomas Grade 1 (non-cancerous - though some may be cancerous-Grade 111- and spread) that generally occur in young infants (< 2 years of age).


What causes choroid plexus brain tumor? 

The cause of choroid plexus brain tumors is unknown. Though uncommon, some believe it may be associated with a rare genetic disease known as Li-Fraumeni syndrome.


What are the symptoms of choroid plexus brain tumor? 

As the tumor grows it can block the flow of cerebrospinal fluid. This increases the amount of fluid in the ventricles (“water on the brain“- hydrocephalus), increasing the pressure in the brain causing the brain/skull to get larger and causing headache, nausea, vomiting, irritability, fatigue and difficulty feeding or walking.


What are choroid plexus brain tumor care options?

Surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation singly or in combination may be utilized.


Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 2/8/2018 3:48:43 PM

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