Cavernous Malformations

Also known as: cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM), cavernous angioma, cavernous hemangioma, cavernoma

What are cavernous malformations?

Cavernous malformations are frequently small (but may be quite large) clusters of blood vessels that form abnormally. They can be found anywhere on, or in the body , but usually only cause problems when in the brain or spinal cord.


What causes cavernous malformations?

In some cases (1 in 4) cavernous malformations run in families and are passed along from parents to their children. For most, however the cause in unknown.


What are the symptoms of cavernous malformations?

Symptoms only occur if the blood vessels bleed a lot or press on the brain or spinal cord. When that happens the neurological problems may include problems with vision and memory, headaches, seizures, arm and leg weakness, balance or other problems.


What are cavernous malformation care options?

If the malformation is not causing any symptoms, it is typically monitored for any growth or change over time. When symptoms appear, surgery to remove the cavernous malformation may be required with medications to treat seizures or other symptoms.

 

LogoProviding a full spectrum of care for Neurovascular disorders in children

Part of the hospital's world-renowned Brain Institute, which is consistently ranked among the top programs in the nation for pediatric neurology and neurosurgery, the Nicklaus Children's Hospital's Neurovascular Center of Excellence is one of only a few centers of its kind in the nation and is the only center in South Florida specializing in treatment of children with vascular malformations and stroke.


Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 3/23/2018 1:57:30 PM


Upcoming Events

Communication and Feeding Difficulties in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

This class is offered to parents and caregivers of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Learn more and register

Video

video
Meet our July Patient of the Month, Lacy. Lacy was only 2 years old when her parents noticed that something was wrong. They took her to various doctors to try to find what could be the cause, Lacy had an 8 cm. tumor in her brain, occupying most of the lower part of her head.


From the Newsdesk

BWS Family Conference
07/20/2018 — This conference is designed to provide individuals with Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) and their family’s up-to-date information about the possible aspects of BWS and their management.  
Pediatric Neurosurgeon and Chief of Surgery for Nicklaus Children’s Passes Away
05/24/2018 — The medical staff, employees and volunteers of Nicklaus Children’s Hospital mourn the passing of our esteemed Dr. Sanjiv Bhatia, a longstanding leader and dedicated champion for children with complex medical conditions and their families.