Soy Allergy

Also known as: soybean allergy, food allergy.

What is soy allergy?

Food allergies are when a person develops allergy antibodies (IgE antibodies) to a protein in a food, and when exposed to this protein it causes an allergic reaction. If a person has an allergic reaction after ingestion of soy protein, this is known as a soy allergy.
 

What causes soy allergy?

We do not know why certain people develop food allergies and others do not. There are many theories as to why food allergies are becoming more prevalent.

 

What are the symptoms of soy allergy?

Symptoms of an allergic reaction to soy are: hives, swelling, wheezing, difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach cramping.
 

What are soy allergy care options?

The only option at this time is to strictly avoid soy. Even small amounts of soy protein that is ingested can cause a severe allergic reaction. Everyone diagnosed with food allergy should have a food allergy action plan, and carry an auto injectable epinephrine device, as this is the only medication that treats anaphylaxis (a severe allergic reaction). There is a chance that people can grow out of their food allergies. A board certified allergist can evaluate and determine if these foods can be reintroduced into the diet.


Reviewed by: Amy S Feldman, MD

This page was last updated on: 4/26/2018 9:41:39 PM

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