ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) Injury

Also known as: ACL

What is an ACL Injury?

A torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) — a ligament that helps give the knee its stability — is one of the most serious types of knee injuries. Kids with a partially or completely torn ACL will definitely feel pain when the ACL tear happens. Afterward, they may or may not have symptoms, depending on the severity of the injury.

How many injuries are reported annually?

About 250,000 to 300,000 people per experience a complete ACL tear each year.

Who is most likely to sustain this type of injury?

Female high school and college athletes are three to four times more likely than their male athlete counterparts to sustain an ACL injury.

Re-injury

After an ACL surgery, one in four athletes will incur a second ACL injury.

Recovery

Extensive rehabilitation with physical therapy is required after an ACL injury and the athlete must temporarily suspend participation in the chosen sport for an extended period.

Prevention

Research shows that participation in a neuromuscular training program can reduce the risk of ACL injury in female athlete.

This page was last updated on: 11/8/2017 1:40:07 PM

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