Ebstein's Anomaly of the Tricuspid Valve

Also known as: Ebstein’s anomaly, Ebstein anomaly, anomaly of the tricuspid valve

What is ​Ebstein’s Anomaly of the Tricuspid Valve?

The tricuspid valve separates the right atrium ( right upper chamber of the heart ) from the right lower chamber ( the right ventricle ). There are many different heart defects that can occur as an infant is born. Together, these are known as congenital heart defects. When Ebstein’s anomaly of the tricuspid valve, also known as Ebstein’s or Ebstein anomaly for short, occurs, it means that the tricuspid valve between the right atrium and the right ventricle of the heart is deformed. This can either cause blood to leak back into the atrium, or block the flow of blood entirely.


What causes Ebstein’s anomaly of the tricuspid valve?

Like many congenital heart defects, the exact cause of Ebstein’s anomaly of the tricuspid valve is not known. It occurs as the heart is being formed within the fetus. A combination of genetic and environmental factors may play a role.


What are the symptoms of Ebstein’s anomaly of the tricuspid valve?

The improper blood flow that results from Ebstein’s anomaly of the tricuspid valve can cause symptoms such as abnormal heartbeat, blue lips or skin caused by reduced oxygen, extreme tiredness or shortness of breath.


What are Ebstein’s anomaly of the tricuspid valve care options?

Treatment for Ebstein’s anomaly depends on how severe it is. Mild cases require only careful monitoring, while some issues can be managed with medications. Surgery may be required to repair problems that are causing more severe symptoms.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 1/10/2017 3:27:47 PM

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